Students praised for outstanding Extended Projects

Six of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) Award winners and finalists

 

Students have been recognised for producing excellent work in their Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) alongside their A levels. The production of these 5,000 word dissertations, reports, artefacts or performances requires young people to work independently and develop research skills which will prove valuable at university and in the workplace. A good mark for an EPQ on a student’s CV will also impress admissions tutors and potential employers.

This year’s winners are:
• Charlotte Lewis (most organised)
• Joe Skinner (distance travelled)
• Oliver Lugg (outstanding intellectual curiosity)
• Tara Yeoman (innovation)

In all, nine students were finalists.

“EPQs are increasingly popular and up to 500 students chose to get involved each year,” says Haley Thomson who runs the scheme. “They can follow their own interests, work creatively and use their initiative to produce a piece of work equivalent to half an A level. We find Russell Group research-intensive universities are especially interested in how applicants fare in their EPQs and some make reduced offers to students who achieve A or A*”

Innovation prize winner Tara Yeoman designed and produced a cook book linking food and emotions and sold copies to friends and family in aid of UNICEF and the Alzheimer’s Society. “For example, certain dishes make me happy so they are the ones I choose when I need cheering up,” she explains. “I hope my book will encourage people to cook for themselves. It’s enjoyable, reduces stress and is not too difficult.”

Barton Peveril Principal Jonathan Prest adds: “The bravery of the idea is matched by the outstanding photography and design to produce a professional recipe book. A truly scrumptious piece of work!”

Tara, who went to King’s School in Winchester, is on a Foundation Year in design and is planning to study graphic design at university.